Linked to diet and lifestyle, atherosclerosis is common in developed Western nations and can lead to heart disease or stroke. It is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the progressive depositing of atherosclerotic plaques (immune cells carrying oxidized LDL or low-density lipoproteins). A growing body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoid signaling plays a critical role in the pathology of atherogenesis.[181] The condition is now understood to be a physical response to injuries in the arterial walls’ lining, caused by high blood pressure, infectious microbes, or excessive presence of an amino acid called homocysteine. Studies have demonstrated that inflammatory molecules stimulate the cycle leading to atherosclerotic lesions.[182] Existing treatments are moderately effective though carry numerous side effects. CB2 receptors triple in response to inflammation, allowing anandamide and 2-AG, the body’s natural cannabinoids, to decrease inflammatory responses. The CB2 receptor is also stimulated by plant-based cannabinoids.[183]
Bergamaschi, M. M., Queiroz, R. H. C., Chagas, M. H. N., de Oliveira, D. C. G., De Martinis, B. S., Kapczinski, F., . . . Crippa, J. A. S. (2011, February 9). Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naive social phobia patients. Neuropsychopharmacology, 36(6), 1219-1226. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v36/n6/full/npp20116a.html?foxtrotcallback=true
It’s not just anxiety. Uncontrolled inflammation is also associated with depression and psychotic disorders. Lately I’ve been thinking about combining cannabinoid with low dose naltrexone an opioid receptor antagonist. My thinking is that since CBD also interacts with opioid receptors, as an allosoteric modulator, that by blocking those receptors we may get some novel interactions that I think may be beneficial for anxiety and other inflammatory related disorders.

Scott Shannon, M.D., assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”


Guidelines For CBD Oil Buyers:  Thousands of orders get purchased online every day. Odds are, you will never get approached for buying a few CBD Oil tinctures.  Make sure they are from Hemp and make sure you are taking it as a dietary supplement.  We recommend going a step further and simply protect yourself!  Be under the care of a physician and get a medical marijuana card.
CBD oil is made by mixing the extracted CBD or cannabidiol from the cannabis or marijuana plant (Cannabis Sativa) with coconut or hemp seed oil. CBD oil possesses cannabidiol; while THC is psychoactive, CBD is not, thereby helping relieve pain, treating anxiety and depression, fighting cancer, reducing anxiety. It also improves the quality of sleep, boosts appetite, and optimizes digestion.
Side effects of CBD include somnolence, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][10][11] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][12] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]
Would I say that CBD oil has fundamentally changed my life? No. But per the Charlotte's Web website, this is the typical first experience. "Anyone who has ever started a new vitamin or supplement routine knows the short answer to how long it takes to kick in is—'it depends,'" reads the article on what to expect from hemp oil. "For many newcomers, they're not sure what to imagine, or some anticipate a huge change right away. For most of us, though, dietary supplements take time." 
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