We have 20 lb dog that is an idopathic epileptic. He is currently on Keppra (375 mg three times daily) and phenobarbital (32.4 mg two times daily). We have CBD oil and want to use it. We have seen many documentaries and articles of it’s positive effects on epilepsy. One thing always seems to be missing is the dosage level. What dosage level should be used for a 20 lb dog and how often? We believe in this, but don’t know how to administer it correctly.
On September 4, 2003, on my husband’s birthday, I had surgery at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles. I spent the next day, our 19th wedding anniversary in ICU. The pathology report came back an Oligodendroglioma grade 2. The surgery was an apparent success and neither radiation nor chemotherapy were recommended. However, since it’s unlikely every cancer cell can be detected and removed, and the nature of gliomas are to grow back over time, it was necessary to continue MRI monitoring every 3 months. Living from MRI to MRI had become our “normal”.

Hi Colleen, it's almost a year later and I'm wondering how you're doing. I'm experiencing a recurrence of Stage 3 ovarian, originally diagnosed in 2011. I've decided to get some chemo, not sold on another 6 cycles though. As a new MMJ patient, I'm still going to go through with Rick Simpson Oil (THC+CBD,) and I just joined a program with my local dispensary to get CBD capsules for $2 each when I order them at least 30 at a time. I hope you're doing well!! I'm off to do more research on dosing. **NOTE: If you have ANY experience with CBD treatment of ovarian cancer, PLEASE respond. Thank you!!
CBD and THC interact with body cells by activating the cannabinoid receptors. By transmitting signals throughout our bodies, these receptors cause different physiological effects. Some cannabinoids are beneficial to us, while others cause undesirable psychotropic effects in our bodies such as “highs” or depression. Some of these substances cause both. There are as yet no studies that show undesirable effects from Cannabidiol, which is why it is legal worldwide. However, many studies show that CBD causes only desirable effects or no effects at all. Certain studies also show that CBD protects against the negative effects of THC. Note that a whole lot of research on Cannabidiol is still in the pipeline.

One area where CBD is clearly helpful: the treatment of seizures associated with one form of epilepsy. A 2017 New England Journal of Medicine study found ingesting oral CBD dramatically cut down most patients’ seizure frequency—a finding that prompted the FDA to support the approval of one CBD drug for use in the treatment of some epilepsy patients.
Evidence from human studies strongly supports the potential for CBD as a treatment for anxiety disorders: at oral doses ranging from 300 to 600 mg, CBD reduces experimentally induced anxiety in healthy controls, without affecting baseline anxiety levels, and reduces anxiety in patients with SAD. Limited results in healthy subjects also support the efficacy of CBD in acutely enhancing fear extinction, suggesting potential for the treatment of PTSD, or for enhancing cognitive behavioral therapy. Neuroimaging findings provide evidence of neurobiological targets that may underlie CBD’s anxiolytic effects, including reduced amygdala activation and altered medial prefrontal amygdala connectivity, although current findings are limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of independent replication. Further studies are also required to establish whether chronic, in addition to acute CBD dosing is anxiolytic in human. Also, clinical findings are currently limited to SAD, whereas preclinical evidence suggests CBD’s potential to treat multiple symptom domains relevant to GAD, PD, and, particularly, PTSD.
Seizures occur when there’s a dramatic fluctuation of electrical activity in the brain. Over the years, a number of high profile cases have raised awareness of CBD’s anti-seizure properties, but it’s only recently that science has been able to confirm this link. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine explored the effect of CBD medication on young adults with Dravet syndrome, a rare type of epilepsy with seizures that are often induced by fever. Those who received CBD experienced saw their seizure frequency drop by a median of 38.9 percent.
While it wasn't like I was 100% stress-free overnight, I did notice within a week or so of taking CBD oil — roughly six to eight drops under the tongue, held for 90 seconds and then swallowed, twice a day — that I felt less anxious and tense. Things that usually bothered me, like unanswered emails or things going wrong with work, were easier to take in stride.
Similar to supplements, CBD production and distribution are not regulated by the FDA. That means it’s important to choose wisely in order to know exactly what you’re getting. A new study in the journal Pediatric Neurology Briefs tested 84 CBD products purchased online and found that 21 percent actually contained THC, 43 percent contained more CBD than listed, and 26 percent contained less CBD than listed.
Cannabidiol oil is extracted from the varieties of cannabis plants that have CBD occurring naturally in large amounts and THC in low amounts. To ensure a high concentration of CBD in the oil, a specialized process is used to extract the compound. The oil contains other compounds like terpenes, omega-3 fatty acids, amino acids, chlorophyll, vitamins, and phytocannabinoids like cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidivarin, and cannabinol.
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