That headache study cites research linking CBD to lower rates of anxiety. (Since anxiety often produces headaches, the authors say, CBD could be a plausible headache remedy if those anti-anxiety benefits are legit.) Grant says he’s looked at the literature on CBD and anxiety, and some of it is enticing. He mentions a Brazilian study, for instance, that found people with a fear of public speaking felt less anxiety and less discomfort about their phobia after taking CBD, compared to those who took a placebo.

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Most anti-anxiety medications, or anxiolytics, fall into two different categories: SSRIs, or sedatives. SSRIs are most commonly used to treat depression, and this includes medications like Zoloft, Lexapro, or Prozac. SSRIs help a lot of people, but they carry with them the potential to cause weight gain, insomnia, and sexual side effects. These side effects can sometimes last beyond the time you’ve stopped taking medicine.
Nature’s Script also sells a pet CBD tincture in 150mg, 300mg, and 1,000mg concentrations. As a general rule of thumb, low-concentration oils are a good option for smaller dogs while larger concentrations may be more suitable for larger breeds – but pet owners should always check with their vet beforehand. In addition to standard shipping, Nature’s Script offers expedited delivery for customers in the contiguous U.S.
Evidence from animal studies have begun to characterize the details of how CBD acts in the brain, and human studies of patients with and without anxiety disorders are starting to validate CBD’s efficacy as an anti-anxiety treatment. Given the huge social and financial costs of anxiety disorders in the U.S., CBD has the potential to play a significant role in treating a myriad of anxiety-related disorders.

WR = Wistar rats; SM = Swiss mice; L-E HR = Long–Evans hooded rats; i.p. = intraperitoneal; dlPAG = dorsolateral periaqueductal gray; i.c.v. = intracerebroventricular; PL = prelimbic; IL = infralimbic; BNST = bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; CeA = amygdala central nucleus; SNpr = substantia nigra pars reticularis; CUS = chronic unpredictable stress; GSCT = Geller–Seifter conflict test; CER = conditioned emotional response; EPM = elevated plus maze; VCT = Vogel conflict test; CFC = contextual fear conditioning; RS = restraint stress; ETM = elevated T maze; PAG E-stim = electrical stimulation of the dlPAG; L-DT = light–dark test; SI = social interaction; OF = open field; MBT = marble-burying test; PS = predator stress; NSF = novelty suppressed feeding test; GABAA = γ-aminobutyric acid receptor A; dlSC = deep layers superior colliculus; REM = rapid eye movement; NA = not applicable
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
In the United States, non-FDA approved CBD products are classified as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.[62] This means that production, distribution, and possession of non-FDA approved CBD products is illegal under federal law. In addition, in 2016 the Drug Enforcement Administration added "marijuana extracts" to the list of Schedule I drugs, which it defined as "an extract containing one or more cannabinoids that has been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis, other than the separated resin (whether crude or purified) obtained from the plant."[63] Previously, CBD had simply been considered "marijuana", which is a Schedule I drug.[62][64]
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