My 13 year old daughter has POTS (postural orthastatic tachycardia syndrome) and EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome). The EDS causes joint displacement and severe pain we also think she may have chronic fatigue syndrome. Right now I’m giving her Plus CBDoil spray that I put in a vegan capsule because she doesn’t like the taste. Two sprays is 8mg of hemp oil and 1mg of cannabinol (CBD). I can tell it’s working because when I give it to her she doesn’t complain as much from pain. But trying to get her to take it on a daily bases is hard. My question is how long does CBD usually last in the system before I would need to give her another dose? She weighs 89 pounds. Also when she dislocates a joint will this help with the inflammation that occurs?
My daughter is 31. She has been having terrible problems with alcohol for about 6 or 7 years. As time goes on she just gets worse and worse. Of course her drinking means that she ends up in the company of some pretty awful people. Drinkers of course. These men that she finds only seem to make her life so much worse. She then drinks more to get away from her terrible life and so it goes on. We have tried for years to give her as much support as we can. Financially she has depended on us for years now.
It’s also nearly impossible to overdose on CBD. Kind of like water, dark chocolate, and steamed kale, it has an unusually low level of toxicity. In the last 6,000 years, CBD hasn’t killed anyone via overdose, which is particularly impressive when you compare it to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, Advil and Tylenol, which can wreak havoc on your gut lining, liver and kidneys. Or aspirin (salicylic acid) which kills over 1,000 people every year. Or alcohol, which kills over 110,000 people a year. No one’s ever died from CBD.

Manufacturers have different extraction and plant source methods which cause the CBD oil to have different levels of THC. It’s always advisable to check on the labels to check whether THC levels is less than 0.3 percent. It’s important to note that chances on intoxication are highly unlikely, but some THC found in CBD oils can show up in a drug test.


The founder of Elixinol got his start in the hemp industry back in 1991, when he launched a “9bar,” a healthy snack bar packed with heart-healthy hemp which remains one of the world’s most popular hemp products. Elixinol sells an array of CBD products, including Tinctures, Capsules, Liposomes, Vape Liquids, and Topical Balms, all of which contain the purest-possibly hemp. The company sources hits hemp from farms in Europe, Australia, and America, uses a chemical- and heat-free, broad-spectrum CO2 extraction process, and employs a team of medical professionals to research and develop their product formulations. Most impressive, however, is the company’s standards of testing, which is conducted both in house and third-party, and which covers potency, microbiological contamination, heavy metals, pesticides, and terpene profile. The European-based labs employ equipment and personnel from the pharmaceutical industry, and all test results are posted online alongside product listings. There are a few contenders for best CBD oil for anxiety in their product selection. Their original and cinnamint-flavored CBD tinctures are most popular, and come in strengths of in dosages of 300 or 600 mg per 15 ml bottle, or 3,600 mg per 120 ml (or, available for order from Brazil only, a heavy-duty 5,000 mg). The blend contains CBD suspended in hemp oil, plus Amino acids, Natural Sugars, Aldehydes, Alcohols, Ketones, Flavanoids, Glycosides, and Vitamins. Those In search of a portable CBD for anxiety can try their 15 mg CBD capsules, 300 mg or 600 mg oral spray, or Elixinol’s proprietary “X-Pen”, which is pre-loaded with 1,000 mg CBD and delivers precise dosages on-the-go.
We gave the highest points to companies that use a CBD distillate for their tinctures. The process of distillation creates an extract that is pure on a molecular level. There are people who think distillate is too pure, and that a full spectrum decarb produces a more effective tincture. But in light of the inconclusive evidence, we prefer a distillate. The process allows for a high degree of control as to the finished product. It’s also odorless and tasteless, so those tinctures tend to taste better.
The current trend in the cannabis-related area of research started in the late sixties and early seventies when products derived from cannabis (especially marijuana) were placed on the list of controlled substances in the US, under the Nixon administration. This move was retroactively interpreted as being part of the conservative reaction to the liberalizing spirit of the sixties.

At the federal level, CBD is classified as a Schedule 1 drug in the U.S. because it is one of the many cannabinoids present in marijuana. To be labeled a schedule 1 drug means that it has a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological or physical dependence; therefore these drugs are not allowed to be used for medical use.


Here’s the thing, though—CBD oil isn’t just helpful for people with epilepsy. Turns out the oil is highly anti-inflammatory, and according to a 2013 review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology it’s also beneficial for treating anxiety, depression, neurodegenerative disorders like dementia, and even has anti-tumoral properties. Sounds like the ultimate superfood, right? I decided to give this magic oil a whirl and see if I noticed a difference in my mood, anxiety, and stress levels.
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [R+, R].
Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern in the United States. An estimated 30 percent of adults in the United States (that's 66 million people) and an estimated 25 percent of teenagers and preteens are affected by anxiety. As a functional medicine practitioner, I see many people who struggle with anxiety and panic attacks, and from these statistics, it should be no surprise. But just because something is common doesn't make it normal. Fortunately, new insights into the cause of anxiety may help with the development of more effective treatment options.
When people talk about marijuana or use marijuana, they’re usually referring to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). What’s THC? It’s the part of the hemp plant (AKA the cannabis plant) that induces a euphoric state. Or an annoying state, mildly schizophrenic state, depending on your perspective. We can at least say beyond a shadow of a doubt that it makes Family Guy episodes way, way funnier.
For the past couple of years, the field has been experiencing a boom in cannabidiol-related research. What has permeated the scientific consensus stems from efforts undertaken to explain effects of THC, with descriptions of cannabidiol just a by-product of the initial purpose. For example, CBD was thought to have been simply a precursor of THC, mainly due to the structural similarities between the two.
For people who suffer from insomnia, constant anxiety during the night or simply struggle to get a sound, restful night of undisturbed sleep, cannabis sativa essential oil may work like a charm. However, according to a research report published by Dr. Ethan Russo, Director of Research for the International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute, terpenoids produce an “entourage effect”.
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