Last year, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine released a nearly 500-page report on the health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids. A committee of 16 experts from a variety of scientific and medical fields analyzed the available evidence — more than 10,000 scientific abstracts in all. Because so few studies examine the effects of CBD on its own, the panel did not issue any findings about CBD specifically, but it did reach some conclusions about cannabis and cannabinoids more generally. The researchers determined that there is “conclusive or substantial evidence” supporting the use of cannabis or cannabinoids for chronic pain in adults, multiple sclerosis-related spasticity (a kind of stiffness and muscle spasms), and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The committee also found “moderate” evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids can reduce sleep disturbances in people with obstructive sleep apnea, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and multiple sclerosis, as well as “limited” evidence that these substances can improve symptoms of Tourette’s syndrome, increase appetite and stem weight loss in people with HIV/AIDs, and improve symptoms of PTSD and anxiety.


“The brain has these receptors that respond to endocannabinoids, which are neurotransmitters that are naturally produced in the body and brain,” says Jerald Simmons, a neurologist at Houston’s Comprehensive Sleep Medicine Associates. “Some of the cannabinoids in the marijuana plant are very similar to the endocannabinoids in the brain, and they act on the same receptors.”
CBD = cannabidiol; HV = healthy controls; DBP = double-blind placebo; SAD = social anxiety disorder; HC = healthy controls; SPECT = single-photo emission computed tomography; rCBF = regional cerebral blood flow; fMRI = functional magnetic resonance imaging; HPC = hippocampus; HYP = hypothalamus; PHG = parahippocampal gyrus; STG = superior temporal gyrus; MTG = medial temporal gyrus; ACC = anterior cingulate cortex; PCC = posterior cingulate cortex
Even though most manufacturers claim that CBD does not have any side effects, research says otherwise. Sure, most people can tolerate the impact of CBD just fine, but a small portion of the population have been noted to experience not-so-adverse side effects. According to Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, the most common results are tiredness, change in weight, diarrhea, fatigue.
At this moment we all know one thing. Anxiety and depression are the most common mental issues the humanity has encountered ever. They affect millions of people from all over the planet, all ages, and both genders. Yes, there are a lot of treatments for these issues but not all of them are great. Here is the accent on one, relatively new treatment which may be the best one. The best hemp CBD oil for anxiety and depression is a reality nowadays.
CBDPure is one of the only companies that stands by its product. With countless fly-by-night CBD oil scam companies popping up, it’s reassuring to know that if for any reason you don’t like CBDPure’s oil, you’re eligible for a full refund. We don’t think you’ll need it, though: after interviewing patients, reading accounts of anxiety sufferers and their experience with CBDPure, and our own experience with the company, we can confidently say that no other product comes close to providing anxiety relief than CBDPure’s Hemp Oil 600.
Over the years, cannabis oil has been used as an effective treatment for anxiety and depression. Furthermore, it is constantly being researched by scientists. In fact, CBD effects on anxiety is currently considered to be one of the most intriguing and well-funded areas of modern cannabis research; if progress continues in the way that it has over the last several years, then it is very possible that we will develop highly effective ways in which oils for anxiety (and depression) can be used as an effective therapy.
In the meantime, some physicians are forging ahead — and cashing in. Joe Cohen is a doctor at Holos Health, a medical marijuana clinic in Boulder. I asked him what CBD is good for, and he read me a long list of conditions: pain, inflammation, nausea, vomiting, intestinal cramping, anxiety, psychosis, muscle spasms, hyperactive immune systems, nervous system degeneration, elevated blood sugar and more. He also claimed that CBD has anti-cancer properties and can regenerate brain cells and reduce the brain’s levels of amyloid beta — a kind of protein that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. I asked for references, noting that most of these weren’t listed in the Academies report or a similar review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “I think you just have to Google search it,” he said. It’s true that a preliminary study found hints that cannabinoids might reduce beta amyloid proteins in human brain cells, but the study was done in cells grown in a lab, not in people. As for cancer, the FDA sent warning letters last year to four companies that were selling products that claimed to “prevent, diagnose, treat or cure” cancer.
Would I say that CBD oil has fundamentally changed my life? No. But per the Charlotte's Web website, this is the typical first experience. "Anyone who has ever started a new vitamin or supplement routine knows the short answer to how long it takes to kick in is—'it depends,'" reads the article on what to expect from hemp oil. "For many newcomers, they're not sure what to imagine, or some anticipate a huge change right away. For most of us, though, dietary supplements take time."
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