Hi Ben, fantastic article. The information and research you shared is the best I’ve found. I’m already a firm believer and user of CBD. Today I got my blood test results back from the VA, for the first time in 23 years my cholesterol, LDL and HDL are all normal. This is attributed to the daily intake of CBD and Flax oil. I factually know this because two years ago my VA doc expressed concern and wanted to put me on High Cholesterol meds and hypertension classes to help. At that time I started daily intake of CDB along with Flax oil and daily vitamins. And today I’m blown away with my lab results. And this is coming from someone who’s high cholesterol is hereditary. My parents, grandparents and even sibling. No matter how much exercise and good healthy vegetarian lifestyles would ever bring it down. Viola… all normal thanks to CBD, Flax oil and daily vitamins. I can’t exercise much because I’m a service connected disabled Vet with a bad back, along with PTSD. The local dispensaries do not carry your product. My question is how can disabled vets get your product and do you offer veterans any kind of price breaks? I’m already sold on the product, I’m just curious if their are any possible discounts offered. We have a really good program here in Santa Cruz CA for vets, free MM…but its not CBD, it’s flower and THC strains to help with our pain management and PTSD. Enough of my blabbing, just wanted to say thank you, share my good news, and see if any assistance can be offered. Thank you tremendously.

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To meet legal standards in the United States, CBD oil and other products may contain up to 0.3% THC; low enough to avoid all psychoactive effects, but enough to potentially appear on a sensitive drug test. Kat’s Naturals, however, sells CBE products of the utmost purity, containing 0% THC, and free from pesticides, chemicals, and contaminants. The company works with organic hemp cultivated in the Netherlands, and extracts its CBD using a broad-spectrum critical CO2 process, retaining a high amount of omega 3’s and 6’s (heart-healthy fats), vitamins, and phytochemicals. Kat’s Naturals is also big on using synergistic essential oils- also organic- to enhance their CBD’s therapeutic effects. The best CBD for anxiety in their lineup is Relax, a tincture that combines 300 mg CBD, Organic Hempseed oil, and wild orange essential oil, along with Hops oil, a potent calming botanical which has been used to promote sleep since ancient times. Kat’s Naturals recommends this product explicitly as a great CBD for anxiety, as well as for promoting sound sleep, making this an excellent choice for anxiety-induced insomnia.
On the other hand, marijuana-derived CBD and anything else derived from a cannabis plant was still classified by the DEA as a Schedule I drug (defined as a drug with "no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse") until October 2018. In 2016, the DEA stated that all extracts containing more than one cannabinoid would remain classified as Schedule I. However, the approval of Epidiolex had an influence in changing this, and prescription CBD drugs with a THC content of below 0.1% have now been reclassified as Schedule 5, the lowest rating.
Enter CBD oil: an anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety compound. I have seen in my own life, and many of my patients' lives, the positive impact CBD oil can have on anxiety. Studies have found that CBD oil is a natural anxiolytic (anxiety calmer) and is effective in treating social anxiety. CBD calms anxiety naturally without the potential side effects of pharmaceutical anti-anxiety medications.
Cannabidiol has antipsychotic effects. The exact cause for these effects is not clear. But cannabidiol seems to prevent the breakdown of a chemical in the brain that affects pain, mood, and mental function. Preventing the breakdown of this chemical and increasing its levels in the blood seems to reduce psychotic symptoms associated with conditions such as schizophrenia. Cannabidiol might also block some of the psychoactive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Also, cannabidiol seems to reduce pain and anxiety.
I have sporadic back spasms for year I see a chiropractor monthly for maintenance (it help) and deal with daily Knee & hip joint pain due to my job (heavy mechanic/steel work with lots of walking). after reading all the great reviews on CBD oil I want to get off the daily ibuprofen regiment and try CBD oil. I would like to try it as a gel cap but would like some advise on dosage size. I also want to know how often I should take the CBD treatments. any and all advise is appreciated
In terms of cancer, the suggestion is to have three doses of CBD oil each day, and gradually increase the amount to 1 gram per day. The full treatment is believed to take 90 days. Please note that CBD oil is still illegal in many countries, but there is a significant amount of research being done on its medical applications, and a number of reputable sources have put out guides regarding the use of CBD oil for treatment of many diseases.
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Leonard Leinow has three decades of experience growing and studying medical cannabis and brings a unique spiritual perspective to his work. In 2009, he formed Synergy Wellness, a not-for-profit medical cannabis collective in California. Synergy Wellness has over 3,500 members in its collective and is an artisan organization making hand-crafted organic and natural whole plant-based products. They are specialists in CBD (cannabidiol), the non-psychoactive portion of cannabis, and are pioneers in this aspect of the industry. Leinow is known for his proprietary blends of tinctures and medicine used for cancer and epilepsy patients.

The disturbing problem regarding the current status of cannabidiol is expressed in the same source. Institutional endeavors by the Food and Drug Administration to classify it as a drug are in its infancy. Nevertheless, this should mean that CBD could no longer be marketed as a dietary supplement, as that class of products is subject to ridiculously lax regulation. However, there are countless companies (some no larger than a newsstand, while others are listed on the stock exchange) that sell supplements containing cannabidiol (as oil, capsules, sprays, etc.) unencumbered by either state or federal authorities.[18]


FDA DISCLOSURE Representations regarding the efficacy and safety of Rosebud CBD have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA only evaluates foods and drugs, not supplements like these products. These products are not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease. Click here (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22625422) and here (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18728714) to find evidence of a test, analysis, research, or study describing the benefits, performance or efficacy of CBD Oil based on the expertise of relevant professionals. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Always check with your physician before starting a new dietary supplement program. The Cannabidiol (CBD) in Rosebud CBD is a natural constituent of industrial hemp plant and grown in the United States of America. Rosebud CBD does not sell or distribute any products that are in violation of the United States Controlled Substances Act (US CSA). All products contain less than 0.3% THC. All products are legal in all 50 states.
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Naturally, the testimonies of these experts were based on a comprehensive literature review, an endeavor which we have also undertaken, albeit in a less official capacity. While many new products have been hailed as a panacea in their times, and many web sources certainly allude to this status for CBD, our objective was more modest – presenting ten possible benefits of cannabidiol where sufficient evidence exists to back up the claims.

For some reason, Monday morning doesn't seem full of the usual oh my goodness, there could be a disaster around every corner situations I normally conjure up in my mind. Maybe it's because it's sunny outside (always a bonus); maybe it's because my brain is fuzzy with phlegm; maybe it's because my nose piercing, fed up with endless nose-blowing, is pulsating in pain. Maybe it's the oil. Either way, I spend the afternoon praising the oil, wishing I could bathe in it. The phlegm may be causing me to lose it a little.


More recently, 17 states have approved the use of low THC, high CBD products for medical reasons in limited situations. Each state has specific requirements and conditions that need to be followed in order to use CBD legally, such as patient registry requirements and definitions of products that are allowed. (23) The 17 states that allow limited access to marijuana products low in THC and high in CBD include:
Bergamaschi, M. M., Queiroz, R. H. C., Chagas, M. H. N., de Oliveira, D. C. G., De Martinis, B. S., Kapczinski, F., . . . Crippa, J. A. S. (2011, February 9). Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naive social phobia patients. Neuropsychopharmacology, 36(6), 1219-1226.  http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v36/n6/full/npp20116a.html?foxtrotcallback=true

The eCB system regulates diverse physiological functions, including caloric energy balance and immune function [28]. The eCB system is also integral to regulation of emotional behavior, being essential to forms of synaptic plasticity that determine learning and response to emotionally salient, particularly highly aversive events [29, 30]. Activation of CB1Rs produces anxiolytic effects in various models of unconditioned fear, relevant to multiple anxiety disorder symptom domains (reviewed in [30–33]). Regarding conditioned fear, the effect of CB1R activation is complex: CB1R activation may enhance or reduce fear expression, depending on brain locus and the eCB ligand [34]; however, CB1R activation potently enhances fear extinction [35], and can prevent fear reconsolidation. Genetic manipulations that impede CB1R activation are anxiogenic [35], and individuals with eCB system gene polymorphisms that reduce eCB tone—for example, FAAH gene polymorphisms—exhibit physiological, psychological, and neuroimaging features consistent with impaired fear regulation [36]. Reduction of AEA–CB1R signaling in the amygdala mediates the anxiogenic effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone [37], and CB1R activation is essential to negative feedback of the neuroendocrine stress response, and protects against the adverse effects of chronic stress [38, 39]. Finally, chronic stress impairs eCB signaling in the hippocampus and amygdala, leading to anxiety [40, 41], and people with PTSD show elevated CB1R availability and reduced peripheral AEA, suggestive of reduced eCB tone [42].

A team of scientists, herbalists and nutritionists develops their formulas, and the hemp used to make them is grown organically in Denmark. The company maintains strict quality control through chemical-free processing and third party labs testing, with results available to consumers through the Endoca website. Of theirs many products, the best CBD for anxiety is Endoca’s CBD oil capsules or oral drops. Each is cold-extracted, containing terpenes, vitamins, ketones, amino acids, and co-nutrients, and is available in strengths of 5- 10 mg per dose


It sounds like the title of a children’s book, but like so much else that you learned in kindergarten, it’s true. Everyone’s body is different – but everyone’s endocannabinoid system is really unique. For reasons we don’t fully understand, receptors in the endocannabinoid system don’t respond predictably to cannabinoids from person to person. This lack of a predictable response makes standard dosing tricky.
When it comes to using CBD, questions keep coming up, especially from people who try CBD for the first time. Since there are different CBD products and because CBD can be used in different ways, the question of how to use CBD oil is quite legitimate.  What CBD products are available, how they can be used, and the bioavailability of each product is covered in this article.
Designed to provide the optimum absorption of CBD into the blood stream by employing a patented slow release delivery system. It’s well accepted that CBD is most effective when taken sublingualy, however most oils when taken in this way are swallowed and broken down by your body. The Gel-Tab™. is placed under the tongue and the CBD is slowly absorbed resulting in higher rates of CBD being absorbed than what would be achieved with a normal oil
The scientific evidence for CBD's ability to quell anxiety, dampen psychosis, and lift the mood is patchy at the moment, although the National Institute on Drug Abuse is optimistic: "CBD has shown therapeutic efficacy in a range of animal models of anxiety and stress, reducing both behavioral and physiological (e.g., heart rate) measures of stress and anxiety."

Cannabidiol (CBD) has NOT been proven to potentially relieve, relieve, nor cure any severe condition or medical condition listed on this site.  The medical studies, controlled tests, and health information offered on Cannabidiol Life of CBDOilsAndEdibles.com (or any variation of the URL) is an expressed summarization of our personal conducted research done by our team of professionals. The information provided on this site is designed to support, NEVER replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and the patient's/site visitor's physician. Our products are not for use by or sale to persons under the age of 18. Our products should be used only as directed on the label. It should not be used if you are pregnant or nursing. Consult with a physician before use if you have a serious medical condition or use prescription medications. A Doctor's advice should be sought before using this and any supplemental dietary product. All trademarks and copyrights are the property of their respective owners and are not affiliated with nor do they endorse this product.  These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and products listed are not intended to diagnose, potentially relieve, cure or prevent any severe condition. Individual weight loss results will vary. By using this site, you agree to follow the Privacy Policy and all Terms & Conditions printed on this site. Void Where Prohibited by Law.


For this study, 24 people with social anxiety disorder received either 600 milligrams (mg) of CBD or a placebo an hour and a half before performing a simulated public speaking test. Additionally, 12 other people with social anxiety disorder performed the same test without receiving any CBD treatment. Results revealed that pre-treatment with CBD significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment, and discomfort while participants were delivering their speech.


There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:

NuLeaf Naturals CBD oil tinctures are all full spectrum; it is 100% organic and never made with herbicides, pesticides, or chemical fertilizers. The brand offers a full spectrum pet CBD oil tincture, as well. NuLeaf Naturals offers free shipping to all 50 states; the brand’s products are also sold in more than 1,000 retail locations across the country.
Rule #2 – Be consistent with your dosing. Don’t start small and then jump to higher doses. It’s important that your body gets accustomed to the CBD, so gradually increase the amount over time. Also, don’t get discouraged if you do not notice effects immediately – some people have said it took them up to two weeks of daily use before they started noticing positive results.
My 13 year old daughter has POTS (postural orthastatic tachycardia syndrome) and EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome). The EDS causes joint displacement and severe pain we also think she may have chronic fatigue syndrome. Right now I’m giving her Plus CBDoil spray that I put in a vegan capsule because she doesn’t like the taste. Two sprays is 8mg of hemp oil and 1mg of cannabinol (CBD). I can tell it’s working because when I give it to her she doesn’t complain as much from pain. But trying to get her to take it on a daily bases is hard. My question is how long does CBD usually last in the system before I would need to give her another dose? She weighs 89 pounds. Also when she dislocates a joint will this help with the inflammation that occurs?
In a series of placebo-controlled studies involving 15 healthy volunteers, Fusar-Poli et al. investigated the effects of CBD and THC on task-related blood-oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging activation, specifically the go/no-go and fearful faces tasks [109, 110]. The go/no-go task measures response inhibition, and is associated with activation of medial prefrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas [111]. Response activation is diminished in PTSD and other anxiety disorders, and increased activation predicts response to treatment [112]. CBD produced no changes in predicted areas (relative to placebo) but reduced activation in the left insula, superior temporal gyrus, and transverse temporal gyrus. The fearful faces task activates the amygdala, and other medial temporal areas involved in emotion processing, and heightened amygdala response activation has been reported in anxiety disorders, including GAD and PTSD [113, 114]. CBD attenuated blood-oxygen-level dependent activation in the left amygdala, and the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex in response to intensely fearful faces, and also reduced amplitude in skin conductance fluctuation, which was highly correlated with amygdala activation [109]. Dynamic causal modeling analysis in this data set further showed CBD reduced forward functional connectivity between the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex [110].
CBD is one of over 60 compounds found in cannabis that belong to a class of ingredients called cannabinoids. Until recently, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) was getting most of the attention because it’s the ingredient in cannabis that produces mind-altering effects in users, but CBD is also present in high concentrations — and the medical world is realizing that its list of medical benefits continues to grow.

WR = Wistar rats; SM = Swiss mice; L-E HR = Long–Evans hooded rats; i.p. = intraperitoneal; dlPAG = dorsolateral periaqueductal gray; i.c.v. = intracerebroventricular; PL = prelimbic; IL = infralimbic; BNST = bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; CeA = amygdala central nucleus; SNpr = substantia nigra pars reticularis; CUS = chronic unpredictable stress; GSCT = Geller–Seifter conflict test; CER = conditioned emotional response; EPM = elevated plus maze; VCT = Vogel conflict test; CFC = contextual fear conditioning; RS = restraint stress; ETM = elevated T maze; PAG E-stim = electrical stimulation of the dlPAG; L-DT = light–dark test; SI = social interaction; OF = open field; MBT = marble-burying test; PS = predator stress; NSF = novelty suppressed feeding test; GABAA = γ-aminobutyric acid receptor A; dlSC = deep layers superior colliculus; REM = rapid eye movement; NA = not applicable
Of all the reasons that people use CBD today, pain is the most common. The same can be said of cannabis in general. In the United States, over seventy million people suffer from chronic pain, which is defined as experiencing over one hundred days per year of pain. Physicians differentiate between neuropathic (usually chronic) and nociceptive pains (usually time-limited), and cannabis works on most neuropathic and many nociceptive types of pain. A number of studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system is both centrally and peripherally involved in the processing of pain signals.[383] Most discussions of using CBD for pain treatment suggest that finding the right dosage is critical.
CBD oil is a relatively new product to the high street health market, meaning the burning questions are coming in thick and fast. And what better way to find out all the answers than to take a trip to Celtic Wind Crops' cannabis farm in County Louth, Ireland, where they grow hemp and manufacture the 5% strength CBD oil (and powder, and capsules) that has become the first CBD product to be sold in a UK Pharmacy (LloydsPharmacy). Here's everything I learned:
Collin, C., Ehler, E., Waberzinek, G., Alsindi, Z., Davies, P., Powell, K., Notcutt, W., O'Leary, C., Ratcliffe, S., Novakova, I., Zapletalova, O., Pikova, J., and Ambler, Z. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of Sativex, in subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. Neurol.Res. 2010;32(5):451-459. View abstract.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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