Although the research on the medicinal use of cannabis is strong, several studies indicate that the recreational use of cannabis can have persistent adverse effects on mental health. According to a 2013 report published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, depending on how often someone uses, the age of onset, the potency of the cannabis that is used and someone’s individual sensitivity, the recreational use of cannabis may cause permanent psychological disorders.
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Cannabis has been used for centuries to treat nerves and anxiety, as well as other mood problems. CBD may help to improve both depression and anxiety, at least in part through its interactions with serotonin receptors in the brain. Research shows that CBD can reduce both mental and physical symptoms of anxiety. A study of CBD given to people before a public-speaking event indicates that CBD can help reduce stress—this and other research has shown that CBD can be an effective treatment for social anxiety.
In addition to acting on the brain, CBD influences many body processes. That’s due to the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which was discovered in the 1990s, after scientists started investigating why pot produces a high. Although much less well-known than the cardiovascular, reproductive, and respiratory systems, the ECS is critical. “The ECS helps us eat, sleep, relax, forget what we don’t need to remember, and protect our bodies from harm,” Marcu says. There are more ECS receptors in the brain than there are for opioids or serotonin, plus others in the intestines, liver, pancreas, ovaries, bone cells, and elsewhere.
Hi Ben, fantastic article. The information and research you shared is the best I’ve found. I’m already a firm believer and user of CBD. Today I got my blood test results back from the VA, for the first time in 23 years my cholesterol, LDL and HDL are all normal. This is attributed to the daily intake of CBD and Flax oil. I factually know this because two years ago my VA doc expressed concern and wanted to put me on High Cholesterol meds and hypertension classes to help. At that time I started daily intake of CDB along with Flax oil and daily vitamins. And today I’m blown away with my lab results. And this is coming from someone who’s high cholesterol is hereditary. My parents, grandparents and even sibling. No matter how much exercise and good healthy vegetarian lifestyles would ever bring it down. Viola… all normal thanks to CBD, Flax oil and daily vitamins. I can’t exercise much because I’m a service connected disabled Vet with a bad back, along with PTSD. The local dispensaries do not carry your product. My question is how can disabled vets get your product and do you offer veterans any kind of price breaks? I’m already sold on the product, I’m just curious if their are any possible discounts offered. We have a really good program here in Santa Cruz CA for vets, free MM…but its not CBD, it’s flower and THC strains to help with our pain management and PTSD. Enough of my blabbing, just wanted to say thank you, share my good news, and see if any assistance can be offered. Thank you tremendously.
For hemp-based CBD products, most folks have no problems with them getting into Canada. Canada that has specifically stated that they consider CBD whether it comes from hemp or medical marijuana to be a Scheduled II Drug, Class Scheduled II Drug, which means that it has reported medicinal benefits but they would like to control the regulation and the selling of those products. But I don't think they're regulating it too strictly.
Would I say that CBD oil has fundamentally changed my life? No. But per the Charlotte's Web website, this is the typical first experience. "Anyone who has ever started a new vitamin or supplement routine knows the short answer to how long it takes to kick in is—'it depends,'" reads the article on what to expect from hemp oil. "For many newcomers, they're not sure what to imagine, or some anticipate a huge change right away. For most of us, though, dietary supplements take time."
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