While researchers are calling for more robust studies on the role of CBD on mood disorders, there is promising research that points to CBD’s role as an anxiolytic – which means it has anti-anxiety effects. Another study showed CBD to have antidepressant effects comparable to those of the prescription antidepressant Imipramine. We noted above that CBD increases levels of glutamate and serotonin – and it’s these same neurotransmitters that play a crucial role in mood regulation.

I have sporadic back spasms for year I see a chiropractor monthly for maintenance (it help) and deal with daily Knee & hip joint pain due to my job (heavy mechanic/steel work with lots of walking). after reading all the great reviews on CBD oil I want to get off the daily ibuprofen regiment and try CBD oil. I would like to try it as a gel cap but would like some advise on dosage size. I also want to know how often I should take the CBD treatments. any and all advise is appreciated
Great article. That’s a ton of good info. I especially liked the infographic. I found your site while looking for more info for how CBD effects Inflammation in particular. I haven’t read all the 220+ comments (wow) so perhaps someone has mentioned something like this earlier, but I found some great resources worth checking out here. www.cbdantiinflammatory.com

Nabiximols (Sativex), a multiple sclerosis drug made from a combination of TCH and CBD, is approved in the United Kingdom and Canada to treat MS pain. However, researchers think the CBD in the drug may be contributing more with its anti-inflammatory properties than by acting against the pain. Clinical trials of CBD are necessary to determine whether or not it should be used for pain management.
As the brain ages, the creation of new neurons slows down significantly. In order to maintain brain health and prevent degenerative diseases, new cells need to be continuously created. A 2008 study showed that low doses of CBD- and THC-like cannabinoids encouraged the creation of new nerve cells in animal models, even in aging brains.[192] CBD also benefits the brain by helping to prevent other nerve-related diseases like neuropathy and Alzheimer’s disease.
“I don’t think we have that many good drugs for pain, and we know that CBD has fewer side effects than opioids or even nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which can cause bleeding and cardiovascular problems,” he says. “If I have an elderly patient with arthritis and a little bit of CBD can make their knees feel better, I’d prefer they take that than some other drugs.”
Cannabidiol did not reduce responses to negative emotional stimuli or reduce anxiety in healthy participants, according to a study published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research in 2017. Researchers tested participants' responses to negative images or words and threatening emotional faces and sensitivity to social rejection after taking oral cannabidiol.
In a 2011 study, scientists wanted to study the effects of CBD on people with SAD. The scientists selected 24 people with this condition who had never received treatment for SAD then divided participants into two groups. One group received 600 mg of CBD while the control group received a placebo. The scientists then asked study participants to take part in a simulated public speaking test while researchers measured blood pressure, heart rate and other measurements of physiological and psychological stress.
“The brain has these receptors that respond to endocannabinoids, which are neurotransmitters that are naturally produced in the body and brain,” says Jerald Simmons, a neurologist at Houston’s Comprehensive Sleep Medicine Associates. “Some of the cannabinoids in the marijuana plant are very similar to the endocannabinoids in the brain, and they act on the same receptors.”
Thirty minutes later, I was surprised by how subtle the effect was. While I expected a hazy nodding-off effect similar to melatonin's, the oil simply relaxed my body ever so slightly—my heart stopped pounding against my chest, my legs stopped kicking beneath my sheets, my mind stopped racing. I wasn't sure if it was the oil or the late hour, but eventually, physical relaxation gave way to mental relaxation, and I drifted off to sleep.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160

Moreover, simple statistical data has been showing that CBD oil and anxiety is one of the most thoroughly  searched topics on the internet, at least in terms of cannabis-related therapies and medical treatments. Specific searches on “CBD oil anxiety,” in fact, have increased exponentially over the last five years. This is modern proof that natural cannabis therapies are beginning to “see the light” in terms of widespread use, and indeed many countless thousands of individuals are already reaping the benefits of the hemp-based compound.
Because it is an entirely natural product, there is no evidence to suggest that taking more than the recommended dose of CBD oil can be harmful. However, LloydsPharmacy, which has recently begun stocking Celtic Wind CBD, advises this: "As with any food supplement, if you take more than the recommended dose you may feel unwell. We would strongly advise customers not to take more than the recommended dose and to consult their doctor if they have any concerns."
Sativex, an oral spray containing both CBD and THC, can treat MS-induced pain. During one study, researchers gave Sativex to 47 participants with MS. Results were largely positive. Patients who used this spray felt notably better. Their muscle and walking spasms decreased, and they felt pain relief. Thanks to studies such as this one, several countries approved using Sativex in MS treatment.

A 2012 study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found that CBD benefits including possessing anti-nausea and antiemetic effects when it was administered to rats. (13) Researchers found that CBD acts in a diphasic manner, meaning that in low doses it suppresses toxin-induced vomiting, but in high doses it increases nausea or has no effect.
If no effects are noticeable initially, increase your dosage every few days. It takes time for the compound to build up and affect the body. Other cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), trigger almost immediate results (the previously mentioned “high”), but CBD’s effect is milder. Changes can take a few days to become apparent. Therefore, it's important that you stick with the same dosage for a few days before deciding to increase it.

In the United States, non-FDA approved CBD products are classified as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.[62] This means that production, distribution, and possession of non-FDA approved CBD products is illegal under federal law. In addition, in 2016 the Drug Enforcement Administration added "marijuana extracts" to the list of Schedule I drugs, which it defined as "an extract containing one or more cannabinoids that has been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis, other than the separated resin (whether crude or purified) obtained from the plant."[63] Previously, CBD had simply been considered "marijuana", which is a Schedule I drug.[62][64]

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