Good morning! Reading through your article, I'm completely impressed and thinking of the various clinical applications (that depressed patient, that anxious one, my arthritic knees!) for the CBD's. THEN you talk about your product, the combination of co-factors sounding really great, but the nano-particles alarm me. There is a fair amount of research about the hazards of nano-particles in cleaning and cosmetic products, I'm wary of ingesting them for fear of nano-sized items going afield of where I'm intending them to go.
The extract known as CBD oil sold in the U.S. falls into one of two categories. Crystalline isolate exclusively contains CBD, as other cannabinoids have been removed; full spectrum oil, on the other hand, retains THC and other cannabinoids, and is only sold in states where marijuana use has been legalized. CBD oil can be consumed several different ways, including ingested capsules and food products, vaporizing, tinctures, and topical creams. The soporific effects of CBD oil are linked to its concentration; low-concentration oils will produce minimal effects, while high-concentration oils will produce strong effects.

A team of scientists, herbalists and nutritionists develops their formulas, and the hemp used to make them is grown organically in Denmark. The company maintains strict quality control through chemical-free processing and third party labs testing, with results available to consumers through the Endoca website. Of theirs many products, the best CBD for anxiety is Endoca’s CBD oil capsules or oral drops. Each is cold-extracted, containing terpenes, vitamins, ketones, amino acids, and co-nutrients, and is available in strengths of 5- 10 mg per dose


CBD oil is not legal everywhere. It is banned/restricted by countries such as UAE, Dubai, and Saudi Arabia. Although CBD oil is illegal in many of the US states too, some have legalized its use for medicinal purposes. While the number would be ever-changing, as of 2016 there are 17 states in the US which have legalized the use of low THC, high CBD products for medical reasons in limited situations. These states include Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. It is advisable to consult your local health specialist before use.
The list of cannabinoids currently comprises 113 entries, with more and more additions each year. Of these 113, by far the best documented are tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (in this order), with the two also being the most abundant constituents of the cannabis plant. In a typical chemical isolation process, cannabidiol makes up a little under half of the entire extract.

Welcome to Mayo Connect. I am a Volunteer Mentor and not a medical professional. As such I can offer the benefit of my personal experience, as can others on this site, but not medical diagnoses nor medical opinions. We strive to help each other with the understanding that we are all different and what works for me may not work for you. I have gotten so much good from participating in Mayo Connect that I love it.


I have great interest in CBD and appreciate all the information provided, but I have one basic question regarding the nano-particle comparison especially since Bio availability and the ‘potential dangers of crossing the BBB’ by some in a concern. Simply how can you refer to the CBD ad a nano particle when, for reference, a sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometers thick. A strand of human DNA is 2.5 nanometers in diameter. There are 25,400,000 nanometers in one inch. A human hair is approximately 80,000- 100,000 nanometers wide. This said, anyone who does any basic search (or research) will find that Nanoparticles are particles between 1 and 100 nanometers in size. You can see my concern with your comparison to a human hair (1/100th the width) is not even close; A ‘large’ nano-particle (100nm) would still be 1/800th the width of the most ‘thin’ human hair. Could you please clarify for me? Thank you!
CBD likewise communicates with a neurotransmitter called GABA (gamma-aminobutyric corrosive). GABA transfers messages from one brain cell, or neuron, to another; that message usually is “Back off” or “stop pushing.” GABA advises the body when it’s a great opportunity to shut down, and since a huge number of neurons in the cerebrum react to GABA, the impacts include lessening anxiety, quieting the sensory system, assisting with rest, unwinding the muscles.

Naturally, the testimonies of these experts were based on a comprehensive literature review, an endeavor which we have also undertaken, albeit in a less official capacity. While many new products have been hailed as a panacea in their times, and many web sources certainly allude to this status for CBD, our objective was more modest – presenting ten possible benefits of cannabidiol where sufficient evidence exists to back up the claims.


It was in early 2014 that my veterinarian friend first recommended I look into CBD oil for dogs. My oldest dog was suffering from arthritis and my middle dog had recently begun suffering from severe anxiety any time I walked toward the door.  The CBD oil did wonders for both my dogs. Since then, I’ve been a strong advocate for CBD Treats and Oil for Dogs.
CBD Drip makes CBD easy to afford, purchase and use. Their line can be found in many health food shops and retail stores, as well as online, are reasonably priced, and are user-friendly. Their source hemp is pesticide-free, European-grown, and non-GMO, and their broad-spectrum extraction process preserves a wide range of the plants’ cannabinoids, terpenes, antioxidants, and “good fats.” Not only are their products tested by an independent lab for purity, but CBD Drip makes the results of each batch’s third-party tests public on its website, so users can verify their products’ safety for themselves. One of the best ways to use CBD for anxiety in the brand’s product range is with EcoDrops, a line of terpene blends designed to be taken sublingually, and tailored to provide specific effects. There’s Focus, Boost and Relief, but for anxiety, we like Dream, which combines 1,500 mg of active CBD with soothing Lavender, Roman Chamomile and Valerian. This is a great blend for treating insomnia, but can be used for general calming as well. Another option is the company’s unflavored CBD oil, which can be used sublingually or vaped, and comes in strengths of 14.5 mg, 58 mg, 140 mg, 500 mg or 750 mg. Still another choice is CBD Drip’s CBD capsules, which are both vegan and gluten-free. Each potent capsule each contains 30 mg of multi- cannabinoid, full-spectrum hemp extract.
And of course, THC is what most recreational weed users are looking for, which is probably why botanists have figured out since the 1960’s how to increase the amount of THC from around 3% to 5% in the 1960s to as much as 28% in our current decade. So yes, it’s true that we’re not smoking the weed our parents smoked, and one draw on a typical joint these days would probably knock your mom on her ass.
Thirty minutes later, I was surprised by how subtle the effect was. While I expected a hazy nodding-off effect similar to melatonin's, the oil simply relaxed my body ever so slightly—my heart stopped pounding against my chest, my legs stopped kicking beneath my sheets, my mind stopped racing. I wasn't sure if it was the oil or the late hour, but eventually, physical relaxation gave way to mental relaxation, and I drifted off to sleep.
Several studies point to the potential benefits of CBD for anxiety. For generalized anxiety, the National Institute on Drug Abuse says that CBD has been shown to reduce stress in animal studies. Study subjects were observed as having lower behavioral signs of anxiety. Their physiological symptoms of anxiety, like increased heart rate, also improved.
For people who suffer from insomnia, constant anxiety during the night or simply struggle to get a sound, restful night of undisturbed sleep, cannabis sativa essential oil may work like a charm. However, according to a research report published by Dr. Ethan Russo, Director of Research for the International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute, terpenoids produce an “entourage effect”.
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