CBD dosing experiments have shown that small dosages of CBD has an “Active” effect, which means that it actually helps you stay active and focused. Interestingly, large dosages have the opposite effect: a sedative effect. More research has to show what is the optimal dosage to take for the anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects to be optimal, but it’s something one can also experiment with to find the dosage that suits them best.

Coming to my problem, I’m 59 and have been having back paint and stiffness since 1977. All along it was taken to be an orthopedic problem and treated accordingly. It was only in 2007 that I was correctly diagnosed as having AS as my HLA B27 was +ve. Having gone through the range of medication with various side effects, like tinnitus, heart attack I have been advised the biologic Remicade (Inflimab in India). I am reluctant to use an immunosupressive at my age. Also the internet is full of people who are on biologics but are not very happy with ever increasing dosages, costs and side effects.
In the United States, approximately 70 million people suffer from insomnia, insufficient sleep or another sleep disorder. CBD extracts have been mistakenly described as sedating, but I haven’t found that to be the case with my own use and neither has research. Although it’s true that if you take a bunch of CBD (I’ve found 30mg+ of a good, absorbable CBD will do it for me) you will fall asleep like a baby, in modest doses, CBD is mildly alerting, and simply provides a calm, relaxed focus.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
CBD and THC interact with body cells by activating the cannabinoid receptors. By transmitting signals throughout our bodies, these receptors cause different physiological effects. Some cannabinoids are beneficial to us, while others cause undesirable psychotropic effects in our bodies such as “highs” or depression. Some of these substances cause both. There are as yet no studies that show undesirable effects from Cannabidiol, which is why it is legal worldwide. However, many studies show that CBD causes only desirable effects or no effects at all. Certain studies also show that CBD protects against the negative effects of THC. Note that a whole lot of research on Cannabidiol is still in the pipeline.
This seemed to help me. It was an unexpected pleasant surprise, since I tried cbd for pain relief and calming effect. I was a heavy marijuana user for years. I recently quit and I had some unanticipated problems with erectile dysfunction. I think somehow with all the marijuana I smoked I had some kind of hormone imbalance possibly, I know something wasn’t working right. Anyway since I’ve started taking cbd oil haven’t had any more erectile problems. More sensitivity too. Not sure how it would work on a non marijuana smoker, (I think my problems were from the chronic use of marijuana) but it’s definitely worth a try. It works for so many other things and it worked for me!
One study comparing the effects of THC and CBD even found that, while THC increased anxiety by activating the neurotransmitters involved in the "fight or flight" response, CBD actually repressed autonomic arousal—or the nervous system response associated with sudden increases in heart rate or respiration. In other words, CBD is ideal for people looking to relax and unwind—not get out of their minds.

[422] M. H. N. Chagas, A. L. Eckeli, A. W. Zuardi, M. A. Pena-Pereira, M. A. Sobreira-Neto, E. T. Sobreira, M. R. Camilo, M. M. Bergamaschi, C. H. Schenck, J. E. C. Hallak, V. Tumas, and J. A. S. Crippa, “Cannabidiol Can Improve Complex Sleep-Related Behaviours Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behaviour Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Case Series,” Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics 39 (2014): 564–566. doi:10.1111/jcpt.12179.
In the United States, non-FDA approved CBD products are classified as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.[62] This means that production, distribution, and possession of non-FDA approved CBD products is illegal under federal law. In addition, in 2016 the Drug Enforcement Administration added "marijuana extracts" to the list of Schedule I drugs, which it defined as "an extract containing one or more cannabinoids that has been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis, other than the separated resin (whether crude or purified) obtained from the plant."[63] Previously, CBD had simply been considered "marijuana", which is a Schedule I drug.[62][64]
×