Anxiety-related disorders affect a huge segment of our population—40 million adults (18%) in the United States age 18 and older. In response, Big Pharma has developed numerous drugs to treat anxiety-related disorders, from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like Prozac and Zoloft to tranquilizers (the most popular class being benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax).
The 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) is an established anxiolytic target. Buspirone and other 5-HT1AR agonists are approved for the treatment of GAD, with fair response rates [50]. In preclinical studies, 5-HT1AR agonists are anxiolytic in animal models of general anxiety [51], prevent the adverse effects of stress [52], and enhance fear extinction [53]. Both pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT1ARs are coupled to various members of the Gi/o protein family. They are expressed on serotonergic neurons in the raphe, where they exert autoinhibitory function, and various other brain areas involved in fear and anxiety [54, 55]. Mechanisms underlying the anxiolytic effects of 5-HT1AR activation are complex, varying between both brain region, and pre- versus postsynaptic locus, and are not fully established [56]. While in vitro studies suggest CBD acts as a direct 5-HT1AR agonist [57], in vivo studies are more consistent with CBD acting as an allosteric modulator, or facilitator of 5-HT1A signaling [58].
It is well known that people who consume cannabis in other forms notice increased appetite, famously called “the munchies”. However, cannabis essential oil can help regulate your appetite and induce hunger, while also stimulating your digestive system to operate at a regular level. This can help people who want to gain weight quickly, particularly after an extended illness or injury.
Here’s another interesting fact for you: CBD has really strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, due primarily to its effects on your adenosine receptors and cytochrome P-450 and 2C enzymes. When this was first discovered, the US government insisted that cannabis had no medical benefits, but at the same time, they took out patent 6,630,507, which gave them rights to the antioxidant properties of cannabis (which they ironically still claim don’t exist). Incidentally, that patent was not extended to actual oil or capsule extracts of cannabis, so the good ol’ US gummint missed out on some pretty good business opportunities, if you ask me.
Juliana Birnbaum is trained as a cultural anthropologist and skilled in four languages and has lived and worked in the U.S., Europe, Japan, Nepal, Costa Rica and Brazil. In 2005 she founded Voices in Solidarity, an initiative that partnered with Ashaninka indigenous tribal leaders from the Brazilian Amazon to support the development of the Yorenka Ãtame community-led environmental educational center featured in Sustainable [R]evolution. She was the first graduate of the Cornerstone Doula School, one of the most rigorous natural birth programs in the U.S., focusing on a holistic model of care. She is engaged variously as writer, editor, teacher, midwife assistant and mother when not attempting new yoga poses or learning how to garden.
CBD oil is most readily available as a tincture. This can be taken by applying a few drops under your tongue, holding in your mouth for a few moments so it can be absorbed, before swallowing. It can also be added to water or smoothies. A spray form is available (simply spritz under your tongue), as are capsules, creams that can be applied topically, and e-liquid for vape pens.

I suffer from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and migraines for years. I just started taking various vitamins including turmanic because nothing doctors are doing is helping. I take Topamax, Gabapenten, Pepcid, and Claritin and get steroid injections from time to time. I have a neurologist that wants to do Botox injections for the migraines. I’m wondering whether there could be interactions from any of this and taking Nature CBD. I don’t get much help from my doctors except more drugs which make me sick so I’m investigating on my own. Thanks.
Cannabidiol did not reduce responses to negative emotional stimuli or reduce anxiety in healthy participants, according to a study published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research in 2017. Researchers tested participants' responses to negative images or words and threatening emotional faces and sensitivity to social rejection after taking oral cannabidiol.
I have been totally off the effexor and all anti-depressants for 2 weeks now. The dizziness is getting much better however my emotions/agitation are horrible. I cry at everything and am extremely crabby/agitated. I realize most of this has to do with the withdrawal. I really want to see this through to find out if I can live without anti-depressants but at the same time I know it's very hard on my family. I have another doctor appt beginning of April and she says that if I don't feel better by then I most likely will need to go back on an anti-depressant. For the most part I agree with her. My hopes of proving her wrong as getting slim however. I'd like to know how long it took some of you who have withdrawn from anti-depressants to feel somewhat 'normal' or you knew you had to go back on them? I guess I'm asking if another month is a good amount of time for me to determine what I should do. In some ways I feel like I should start on them again now but I'm not going there yet? BTW, I am in no way feeling suicidal. Mornings seem to be my worst time and by early evenings I feel somewhat better – is this strange too? I haven't tried the CBD living water yet but did find a place near me to get it. Just havent had the time to get there. I also have the Ativan which I take one night to help with sleep. I'm trying not to take it unless really necessary. Tomorrow I have a huge even that my husband and I are in charge of so I'm planning to take an Ativan in the morning to get me through the day without falling apart (crying scene) in front of everyone (or yelling at them) :)! Thanks for all your input!!
Here’s another interesting fact for you: CBD has really strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, due primarily to its effects on your adenosine receptors and cytochrome P-450 and 2C enzymes. When this was first discovered, the US government insisted that cannabis had no medical benefits, but at the same time, they took out patent 6,630,507, which gave them rights to the antioxidant properties of cannabis (which they ironically still claim don’t exist). Incidentally, that patent was not extended to actual oil or capsule extracts of cannabis, so the good ol’ US gummint missed out on some pretty good business opportunities, if you ask me.
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