Answering the question “what is CBD oil” would be incomplete without mentioning the many CBD oil benefits. In addition to positively affecting the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been the focus of more than 23,000 published studies about cannabinoids in relation to various medical indications including anxiety, epilepsy, inflammation, cancer and chronic pain to name few. For a more comprehensive look at these and other studies, visit our medical research and education page.
In recent years, CBD has generated a tremendous amount of interest among consumers, clinicians, and scientists. Why? Not only does evidence suggest CBD counteracts many of THC’s adverse effects, but numerous animal studies and accumulating evidence from human experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies suggest CBD has powerful anti-anxiety properties. Administered acutely (“as needed”), it appears safe, well-tolerated, and may be beneficial to treat a number of anxiety-related disorders, including:
Cannabinoids affect the transmission of pain signals from the affected region to the brain (ascending) and from the brain to the affected region (descending). A 2011 study showed that CBD and CBC stimulated descending pain-blocking pathways in the nervous system and caused analgesia by interacting with several target proteins involved in nociceptive control. Authors concluded that the cannabinoids “might represent useful therapeutic agents with multiple mechanisms of action.” [387] The following year, researchers reported that CBD significantly suppressed chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain without causing apparent analgesic tolerance in animals. [388] And then in 2013, researchers concluded that chronic pain patients prescribed hydrocodone were less likely to take the painkiller if they used cannabis. [389]
Hemp oil does have a number of uses and is often marketed as a cooking oil or a product that is good for moisturizing the skin. It is also used in the production of certain soaps, shampoos, and foods. It is also a basic ingredient for bio-fuel and even a more sustainable form of plastic. Hemp has been cultivated and used for roughly 10,000 years, and it definitely has useful purposes. However, a lack of cannabinoids, namely CBD, means that it has little therapeutic value.
I have been totally off the effexor and all anti-depressants for 2 weeks now. The dizziness is getting much better however my emotions/agitation are horrible. I cry at everything and am extremely crabby/agitated. I realize most of this has to do with the withdrawal. I really want to see this through to find out if I can live without anti-depressants but at the same time I know it's very hard on my family. I have another doctor appt beginning of April and she says that if I don't feel better by then I most likely will need to go back on an anti-depressant. For the most part I agree with her. My hopes of proving her wrong as getting slim however. I'd like to know how long it took some of you who have withdrawn from anti-depressants to feel somewhat 'normal' or you knew you had to go back on them? I guess I'm asking if another month is a good amount of time for me to determine what I should do. In some ways I feel like I should start on them again now but I'm not going there yet? BTW, I am in no way feeling suicidal. Mornings seem to be my worst time and by early evenings I feel somewhat better – is this strange too? I haven't tried the CBD living water yet but did find a place near me to get it. Just havent had the time to get there. I also have the Ativan which I take one night to help with sleep. I'm trying not to take it unless really necessary. Tomorrow I have a huge even that my husband and I are in charge of so I'm planning to take an Ativan in the morning to get me through the day without falling apart (crying scene) in front of everyone (or yelling at them) :)! Thanks for all your input!!
While CBD predominantly has acute anxiolytic effects, some species discrepancies are apparent. In addition, effects may be contingent on prior stress and vary according to brain region. A notable contrast between CBD and other agents that target the eCB system, including THC, direct CB1R agonists and FAAH inhibitors, is a lack of anxiogenic effects at a higher dose. Further receptor-specific studies may elucidate the receptor specific basis of this distinct dose response profile. Further studies are also required to establish the efficacy of CBD when administered in chronic dosing, as relatively few relevant studies exist, with mixed results, including both anxiolytic and anxiogenic outcomes.
So far, most of the evidence for CBD’s effects on anxiety comes from animal studies and laboratory experiments. For a report published in the journal Neurotherapeutics in 2015, scientists analyzed this preliminary research and found that CBD oil shows promise in the acute treatment of conditions like generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Research is beginning to show that CBD is different than other well-studied cannabinoids. All cannabinoids act as ligands, meaning they dock onto the binding site of a protein and have the ability to modulate a receptor’s behavior. CB1 receptors are widely distributed, but are particularly abundant in areas of the brain, including those concerned with movement, coordination, pain and sensory perception, emotion, memory, cognition, autonomic and endocrine functions. (2)
This is a common question and misconception. As mentioned above, while they come from the same plant, they are different strains and CBD is harvested from the plants that contain no THC (or negligible levels). CBD is completely legal and is not considered a drug. Because of the often confused history of these plants, many manufacturers use “hemp oil” instead of the more controversial “CBD oil” in their marketing. CBD levels can vary drastically based on manufacturing, so it is important to find a high quality manufacturer with verified levels.
I am thinking of trying CBD oil for my anxiety and insomnia. This has been ongoing since returning from Iraq a few years ago. I am now a Nursing student and feeling the lack of sleep now more than ever. I am currently taking Qualia and Organigi daily and off all prescription medications. I am already giving CBD to my old dog and it is helping her arthritis, just wanna cash in on this without it affecting my school negatively. What would be a good dosage for a 120 lb female to start at? I am very sensitive to medications and drugs, I even cut the Qualia dosage in half.

I’ve been reading a lot about hemp vs. marijuana derived etc. but my major reasons for looking into this are a strong family history of Alzheimers/Parkinsons, depression, anxiety, learning disabilities and ADD with some members of the family having insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and obesity. CBD oil has very little THC–isn’t that the chemical that is helpful w/ Alzheimers prevention? Is there a product w/ more–but not illegally more–THC? Thanks so much.

As marijuana is legalized in more and more states, the wellness world has whipped itself into a frenzy over a non-intoxicating cannabis derivative called cannabidiol. CBD products can be found on the internet and in health-food stores, wellness catalogs and even bookstores. (A bookstore in downtown Boulder, Colorado, displays a case of CBD products between the cash register and the stacks of new releases.) Celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, disgraced cyclist1 Floyd Landis and former Denver Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer are all touting CBD products, and according to Bon Appétit, CBD-infused lattes have become “the wellness world’s new favorite drink.”


Cannabis also has links to Christianity – specifically through the Ethiopian Coptic Church, which is held to have been established by St. Mark (the guy in the New Testament of The Bible) in AD 45. The Copts claim that the use of marijuana as a sacrament descended from a Jewish sect called the Essenes (the folks who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls). According to the Coptic Church, cannabis played an important role in early Christian and Judaic rituals, specifically as a sacrament burned in tabernacles, to commemorate important occasions such as communication with God on Mount Sinai by Moses, and the transfiguration of Christ.
Spanish scientists via their animal studies found that CBD improves the transmission of 5-HT1A, which is a sub-type of receptor of serotonin hormone. It is known that medicines which target the body’s serotonin system can help treat some cases of depression and dealing with anxiety. This is the reason why pharmaceuticals companies have made SSRIs or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as Zoloft and Prozac.
Guidelines For CBD Oil Buyers:  Thousands of orders get purchased online every day. Odds are, you will never get approached for buying a few CBD Oil tinctures.  Make sure they are from Hemp and make sure you are taking it as a dietary supplement.  We recommend going a step further and simply protect yourself!  Be under the care of a physician and get a medical marijuana card.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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This is just a small sample of the research showing the role that CBD plays in reducing stress and reducing anxiety. I’ve found that as little as 10mg CBD vastly lowers my anxiety at the end of the day, and have dosed with as high as 100mg CBD to be as calm as a baby during trans-Atlantic plane flights, nights sleeping in hotel rooms, and other situations where I have difficulty sleeping or tend to be stressed out. The stuff works like a charm, and saves me from having to hunt down an unhealthy, addictive alternative like valium or diazepam.
I have not read all 220+ comments, so perhaps this issue was raised, but I have read in multiple sources that hemp plants and marijuana plants are not the same. Various sites claim that this issue is confusing consumers and they state that (industrial) hemp plants tend to be low CBD and lack the full spectrum of cannabanoids, terpenes and other chemicals. They caution consumers to purchase only CBDs derived from female flowered marijuana plants if they want the full health benefits. They also state that CBDs in isolation do not work as well as when they are coupled with THC and other cannabinoids and terpenes. (Nature always knows best.) Your product is derived from industrial hemp plants according to BioCBD’s website. You have addressed the issue of the female flowers (thank you), but I am still very confused about this issue. Can you clarify? Thank you. P.S. I, personally, won’t be able to use your product because I am sadly allergic to turmeric, but I appreciate the information you have presented here. I will have to wait for another company to manufacture a water soluble product with a different carrier.
I suffer with migraines, fibromyalgia, and arthritis. I pretty much hurt anytime I move. I’m on a regimen of meds, but ordered the Virgin Cannibis Hemp Oil (off of Amazon) and have had it two days. I took 3 tablespoons a day, gagging it down. I couldn’t bring myself to take it today, but I didn’t notice a difference after the second day, and I suppose I would notice something. Was it too soon, or should I be trying a different product? I really need something to alleviate the level of pain during movement, as it’s causing me to be more sedentary.
Evidence from human studies strongly supports the potential for CBD as a treatment for anxiety disorders: at oral doses ranging from 300 to 600 mg, CBD reduces experimentally induced anxiety in healthy controls, without affecting baseline anxiety levels, and reduces anxiety in patients with SAD. Limited results in healthy subjects also support the efficacy of CBD in acutely enhancing fear extinction, suggesting potential for the treatment of PTSD, or for enhancing cognitive behavioral therapy. Neuroimaging findings provide evidence of neurobiological targets that may underlie CBD’s anxiolytic effects, including reduced amygdala activation and altered medial prefrontal amygdala connectivity, although current findings are limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of independent replication. Further studies are also required to establish whether chronic, in addition to acute CBD dosing is anxiolytic in human. Also, clinical findings are currently limited to SAD, whereas preclinical evidence suggests CBD’s potential to treat multiple symptom domains relevant to GAD, PD, and, particularly, PTSD.
i have many ailments that has resulted in disability and i am only 46 thus have little quality of life and i loath taking pills!! i take as few prescriptions as possible so relief is low and so low activity is how i manage – though i know isn’t healthy either – but i believe the more prescriptions you take the more sickness will be created. short of stem cell treatment (which hasn’t been developed as far as i know for my issues) CBD is giving me hope.
Great article. That’s a ton of good info. I especially liked the infographic. I found your site while looking for more info for how CBD effects Inflammation in particular. I haven’t read all the 220+ comments (wow) so perhaps someone has mentioned something like this earlier, but I found some great resources worth checking out here. www.cbdantiinflammatory.com

"A CBD company may create a CBD oil, test it, and use the test results to create their label," Bonn-Miller says. "The problem is if they never test their product again, or they test it once a year, you have no idea whether each batch is the same as the first one that they used to create the label. The vast majority of companies are not using manufacturing standards that assure product consistency over time. Companies should be testing every batch they make and tossing batches that don't fall within the specs of their label."

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