Of all the reasons that people use CBD today, pain is the most common. The same can be said of cannabis in general. In the United States, over seventy million people suffer from chronic pain, which is defined as experiencing over one hundred days per year of pain. Physicians differentiate between neuropathic (usually chronic) and nociceptive pains (usually time-limited), and cannabis works on most neuropathic and many nociceptive types of pain. A number of studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system is both centrally and peripherally involved in the processing of pain signals.[383] Most discussions of using CBD for pain treatment suggest that finding the right dosage is critical.
Cannabidiol (CBD), the second most abundant component of cannabis, is thought to modulate various neuronal circuits involved in drug addiction. A limited number of preclinical studies suggest that CBD may have therapeutic properties on opioid, cocaine, and psychostimulant addiction, and some preliminary data suggest that it may be beneficial in cannabis and tobacco addiction in humans. (Source)
Nonetheless, when it comes to CBD oil and cannabidiol, people seem be getting more aware of the fact that you don’t need to be a pothead to get all the relaxing and hormone and metabolism-balancing properties of weed. Not that the image below is based on hard scientific epidemiological data, but a quick glance at a Google trends profile of searches for “CBD Oil” speaks volumes, doesn’t it?
CBD Oil for Anxiety. Each of us has had reason to be scared in a certain situation before. This reaction to a particular situation is normal and natural. However, when fear takes over and can be triggered by seemingly harmless everyday situations, panic attacks, deep feeling of fear, sweating, one speaks of anxiety. Many are wondering what to do about it and can CBD help with anxiety?
CBD for insomnia is becoming a more popular choice as sufferers from sleeplessness struggle to find a cure. For many users of CBD, better sleep is a common benefit. This is due to CBD’s many positive influences on the central nervous system, including greater relaxation and mood. As CBD tends to calm anxiety and generally help with the ability to sleep soundly, this powerful, natural agent should be considered one of the best ways to sleep fully and restfully during the night.

Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) – CBD reduced the overexpression of iNOS in response to colitis. iNOS overexpression is well correlated with disease activity with colitis, and inhibitors of iNOS lead to improvement in experimental models of IBD. iNOS results in high-output production of NO, which results in oxidative damage to the intestine via reactive oxygen species (ROS).
1.)  A Qualitative Analysis of Online Forum Discussions on Cannabis Use and ADHD conducted by Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center: The results are as followed… “Twenty-five (25%) percent of individual posts indicated that cannabis is therapeutic for ADHD, as opposed to 8% that it is harmful, 5% that it is both therapeutic and harmful, and 2% that it has no effect on ADHD.”  This was the first type of study done of its kind.  View Source

CBD oil may be of some benefit to those with addiction, suggests a review published in the journal Substance Abuse in 2015. In their analysis of 14 previously published studies, scientists determined that CBD may have therapeutic effects in people with opioid, cocaine, and/or psychostimulant addiction. They also found that CBD may be beneficial in the treatment of cannabis and tobacco addiction. There is some evidence that CBD may block or reduce the effects of THC on the mind.
Several scientific reports demonstrate that CBD benefits include possessing antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic effects that inhibit cancer cell migration, adhesion and invasion. (9) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics found for the first time that CBD potently and selectively inhibited the growth of different breast tumor cell lines and exhibited significantly less potency in non-cancer cells. (10)

The article is inaccurate. CBD oil is not mutually exclusive from hemp oil, nor is all hemp made from industrial hemp. The hemp for NatureCBD is organically grown, and the word industrial, while having a negative connotation in this industry because of the fact it implies the oil is dirty, only means to classify that the hemp is grown for production (hemp fibers, basts etc). The oil in NatureCBD is indeed CBD oil, and always has a CBD content above 30%. The only thing that separates NatureCBD from being medical marijuana oil is the high CBD content and low THC content (below 0.01%).

@gailb, where did you purchase the CBD. I also have been curious about the product, but there are lots of sellers on Amazon, but I hate to purchase a supplement that I don't know anything about the seller. Most of them you can find some pretty good lists of sellers that have good reputations. If you could give a brand name that you used and liked, I would appreciate it. If that is something that needs to be a PM, that will be fine. Thank you, Gary
At the federal level, CBD is classified as a Schedule 1 drug in the U.S. because it is one of the many cannabinoids present in marijuana. To be labeled a schedule 1 drug means that it has a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological or physical dependence; therefore these drugs are not allowed to be used for medical use.
As noted, CBD has been found to have a bell-shaped response curve, with higher doses being ineffective. This may reflect activation of TRPV1 receptors at higher dose, as blockade of TRPV1 receptors in the DPAG rendered a previously ineffective high dose of CBD as anxiolytic in the EPM [66]. Given TRPV1 receptors have anxiogenic effects, this may indicate that at higher doses, CBD’s interaction with TRPV1 receptors to some extent impedes anxiolytic actions, although was notably not sufficient to produce anxiogenic effects.
CBD = cannabidiol; HV = healthy controls; DBP = double-blind placebo; SAD = social anxiety disorder; HC = healthy controls; SPECT = single-photo emission computed tomography; rCBF = regional cerebral blood flow; fMRI = functional magnetic resonance imaging; HPC = hippocampus; HYP = hypothalamus; PHG = parahippocampal gyrus; STG = superior temporal gyrus; MTG = medial temporal gyrus; ACC = anterior cingulate cortex; PCC = posterior cingulate cortex
Locsta....I share your pain of degenerative and bulging disk disease, along with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and arthritis. Absolutely no energy and chronic pain all day, every day. I'm curious as to what type and brand of the CBD oil you are taking and for how long have you been using it? I've been researching CBD oil for months and am quite confused!
CBDPure is one of the only companies that stands by its product. With countless fly-by-night CBD oil scam companies popping up, it’s reassuring to know that if for any reason you don’t like CBDPure’s oil, you’re eligible for a full refund. We don’t think you’ll need it, though: after interviewing patients, reading accounts of anxiety sufferers and their experience with CBDPure, and our own experience with the company, we can confidently say that no other product comes close to providing anxiety relief than CBDPure’s Hemp Oil 600.

With that said, I'm definitely intrigued enough by the subtle effects to continue taking the oil and possibly even to up the dosage to the recommended two full droppers of the 30mL bottle per day for a week or so. Plus, I take comfort in knowing that it's an all-natural treatment for anxiety that's responsibly grown on family farms in Colorado. Something that's safe, legal, requires no prescription, and makes me less anxious, less scatterbrained, and more focused? I'm definitely on board.
A study from 2016 worked with 214 people with epilepsy. The study participants added oral doses of 2 to 5mg of CBD per day to their existing anti-epilepsy medications. The study’s researchers monitored the participants for 12 weeks, recording any negative side effects and checking on the frequency of their seizures. Overall, participants had 36.5 percent fewer seizures per month. However, severe adverse effects were recorded in 12 percent of the participants.
If you’ve decided to try this natural and effective treatment, you may be wondering which is the best CBD oil for anxiety? There are many factors to consider in choosing the best CBD oil: sourcing, purity, and range of products, as well as the range of therapeutic dosages. In addition, many companies formulate their CBD using whole-plant extracts and added calming botanical ingredients, such as ashwagandha, St. John’s Wort, or chamomile. Our list of the 10 best CBD oils for anxiety ranks the leading products for this condition, based on careful evaluation of each of these categories. Read up on the best options on the market in CBD oil for anxiety, and enjoy the relief that comes with finding your balance naturally.
We also rated the product based on the type of CBD they used: isolate, full-spectrum decarb, broad-spectrum, or distillate. There’s a lot of debate around what is actually best, but our first decision was to give points to CBD oil that contains a range of cannabinoids. While there are certainly people with good reasons for choosing an isolate, there’s a lot of good evidence that CBD works better in combination with other cannabinoids (this is called the “entourage effect”).
So am I to assume, due to no response/deleted comment that my simple question was too difficult to answer? With all the technical & correct information you have on you GREAT website, can someone (?) not simply correct or acknowledge the FACT the your NOT using nano-particle size product? I am truly interesting (for my wife) in CBD, have done my research, and I love working with numbers which is why if found this discrepancy. Comments welcome, but avoidance is disturbing.
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