Really sorry to hear you can not use our products due to Curcumin. Regarding hemp vs marijuana… yes this is an ongoing debate and the truth is that it's a fairly new debate and a lot of science is needed to make any claims. Yet, we can tell you without a shadow of a doubt that CBD is coming from Hemp along with over 100 different components such as other cannabinoids, terpenes and trade compounds. And thousands of people are able to experience the benefits. Maybe you saw the recent multi-part series on CNN? They were featuring Hemp CBD. CBD in it's whole plant and "entourage effect" is definitely the way to go… stay clear of the isolates or the 99.9% pure cbd products. We proudly use full plant extracts with all parts of the plant. And they are very effective. Anyone that is claiming that Hemp CBD is not as effective should talk to the thousands of families that are finding significant benefits (we will are not allowed to make claims but you can find thousands of people speaking up online about the benefits of Hemp derived CBD). Thanks for your question. You might look into Liposomal CBD, While it does not have the active ingredients our products to, and they use a completely different way to make CBD more bioavailable, it might be good alternative. All other product have to add or remove something to make CBD more bioavailable… in our case, we add a powerful antioxidant/ anti inflammatory herb of Curcumin from Turmeric.
^ Nadulski T, Pragst F, Weinberg G, Roser P, Schnelle M, Fronk EM, Stadelmann AM (December 2005). "Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study about the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on the pharmacokinetics of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) after oral application of THC verses standardized cannabis extract". Ther Drug Monit. 27 (6): 799–810. PMID 16306858.

For the past couple of years, the field has been experiencing a boom in cannabidiol-related research. What has permeated the scientific consensus stems from efforts undertaken to explain effects of THC, with descriptions of cannabidiol just a by-product of the initial purpose. For example, CBD was thought to have been simply a precursor of THC, mainly due to the structural similarities between the two.
Glad you're off that stuff and sorry to hear about the hell of cold turkey on that stuff. I've had a taste of that horror missing doses of a benzo, clonazepam, and now tapering slowly over 5 months. The other things – weed psychological addiction, sugar, caffeine, gonna white knuckle the weed as I'm out soon and saving to take the bar exam. I'm going to try using CBD oil as I heard it's effective at reducing anxiety, lifting mood, and so on. Thank you for sharing and wishing you, too, and us all, good health and peace. Will ask my pharmacist about expected withdrawal. Thank you!
Being legal globally, Cannabidiol is a controlled substance only in Canada. Its misunderstood status results largely from misinformation because there is too little known about CBD, and because of its resemblance to THC. The controlled status of CBD was largely due to the fact it was believed that Cannabidiol was a precursor to the formation of THC. Only as recently as the 1980’s did scientists discover that CDB is actually completely unrelated to the formation of THC. CBD has since been declared a legal cannabinoid and is safe to consume in any amount and concentration. 
It's the Wild West out there. Without any federal regulatory body checking labels, consumers have very little way of knowing what they're buying when they purchase CBD oil. Bonn-Miller co-authored a study that found that 26 percent of CBD products on the market contained less CBD than their label claimed. So the amount you need for an effective dose could vary drastically, not just from product to product, but from bottle to bottle of the same product.
In the United States, non-FDA approved CBD products are classified as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.[62] This means that production, distribution, and possession of non-FDA approved CBD products is illegal under federal law. In addition, in 2016 the Drug Enforcement Administration added "marijuana extracts" to the list of Schedule I drugs, which it defined as "an extract containing one or more cannabinoids that has been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis, other than the separated resin (whether crude or purified) obtained from the plant."[63] Previously, CBD had simply been considered "marijuana", which is a Schedule I drug.[62][64]
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