If you’re anything like me and often have trouble falling asleep at night, you will definitely like CBD products. Being a CBD user for long time I have been taking CBD oil for Insomnia a long time I’ll say it has helped my sleep better. From what I know Cannabidiol a.k.a CBD is great relaxant that have helped many people, including me, sleep better. With dosage I always recommend to my friends to start with low, then see if it suits them and then work their way up.
Nora Volkow from the National Institute on Drug Abuse reiterated the decision of (then) two dozen states to allow medical marijuana to be used in one way or another in their jurisdictions. This should open everyone’s eyes to the sanctioning of a non-addictive, non-psychoactive substance which has been linked to benefits for patients suffering from seizure disorders, quite a few neurodegenerative disorders or pain resulting from cancer.
Along with its better-known counterpart, THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical that produces the marijuana high), CBD is one of more than 400 compounds found in the oils of cannabis plant species, which include marijuana and hemp. Unlike THC, CBD will not make you high. That said, this doesn’t mean CBD is not at all psychoactive, as many assert, says Jahan Marcu, Ph.D., director of experimental pharmacology and behavior at the International Research Center on Cannabis and Mental Health in New York City: “CBD does change cognition. It affects mood, which is why people take it for anxiety. And some find that it makes them more alert.”

Kevin Sabet, a psychiatrist at the University of Florida’s Drug Policy Institute, presented a six-point plan whose purpose is accelerating officially sanctioned serious research in the properties of cannabidiol and relaxing barriers for private actors interested in the matter, who would nevertheless pursue this avenue in a grayer area and thus, less safe.
People suffering from other neurological disorders might also benefit from using CBD oil as part of their treatment. Several studies involving Parkinson’s disease showed that participants slept better after treatment. Furthermore, their overall quality of life increased. Amazingly, CBD also showed positive benefits in treating or preventing Alzheimer’s disease. As CBD lowers inflammation, it helps prevent nerves from degenerating. During one study, scientists used mice with the genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease. They found that CBD helped by preventing the mice’s cognitive decline.
Studies in humans, including many of those cited below, have demonstrated that CBD dosage reduces anxiety (once again, compared to the increased levels of anxiety that THC produces), and that when you combine CBD with THC, it takes the anxiety edge off THC. This is due to the action of CBD on 5HT1A and TRPV1 receptors, both of which are involved in mitigating the anxiolytic, panic and fear responses to stress.
In the meantime, some physicians are forging ahead — and cashing in. Joe Cohen is a doctor at Holos Health, a medical marijuana clinic in Boulder. I asked him what CBD is good for, and he read me a long list of conditions: pain, inflammation, nausea, vomiting, intestinal cramping, anxiety, psychosis, muscle spasms, hyperactive immune systems, nervous system degeneration, elevated blood sugar and more. He also claimed that CBD has anti-cancer properties and can regenerate brain cells and reduce the brain’s levels of amyloid beta — a kind of protein that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. I asked for references, noting that most of these weren’t listed in the Academies report or a similar review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “I think you just have to Google search it,” he said. It’s true that a preliminary study found hints that cannabinoids might reduce beta amyloid proteins in human brain cells, but the study was done in cells grown in a lab, not in people. As for cancer, the FDA sent warning letters last year to four companies that were selling products that claimed to “prevent, diagnose, treat or cure” cancer.

On the other hand, marijuana-derived CBD and anything else derived from a cannabis plant was still classified by the DEA as a Schedule I drug (defined as a drug with "no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse") until October 2018. In 2016, the DEA stated that all extracts containing more than one cannabinoid would remain classified as Schedule I. However, the approval of Epidiolex had an influence in changing this, and prescription CBD drugs with a THC content of below 0.1% have now been reclassified as Schedule 5, the lowest rating.


Two additional studies in this area were done using CBD oil. In the first one, 214 participants would take 0.9 to 2.3 grams of oil per 1 pound of body weight. CBD successfully reduced seizures by a median of 36.5%. The second study focused on children who suffered from Dravet syndrome. Dravet syndrome is a type of epilepsy that happens in early infancy. Normally high temperatures and fevers trigger it. The results of the second study showed that CBD oil reduced seizures significantly.

I am having some major issues with major anxiety and major depression that seems to be treatment resistant. I am currently on 75mg of Zoloft, 12.5mg of Seroquel for sleep, 5 to 10 mg of Valium a day and several vitamins as well. I have tried a number of different anti depressants. Nothing seems to be helping much. Out of desperation I have been exploring other options. My question is can I use the oil with all these other meds. Clearly I can’t just stop them but am hoping if I could get the anxiety and depression under control then I could wear off the pharma meds. If you can’t answer this question could you direct me to someone who could. Thanks!!’
Cooper recently got funding from the National Institutes of Health for a study looking at cannabinoids — including CBD in isolation — as a substitute for opioids, and numerous other clinical trials of CBD are underway. It will be several years before results are available, but these studies should help clarify both what benefits the substance may provide and any side effects it may come with. Most of the adverse effects so far associated with cannabis, such as impairments in short-term memory, coordination and judgment,2 come from products that contain THC as well as CBD, Cooper said, but we need to do more studies to find out for sure whether CBD has fewer risks. Studies are also needed to identify the best way to administer and dose CBD. “I get emails from people asking me what dose of CBD to use, and the truth is, we really don’t know,” Cooper said.

But, uh, what is it that CBD is supposed to do? I visited a cannabis dispensary in Boulder to find out what the hype was all about. After passing an ID check, I was introduced to a “budtender” who pointed me to an impressive array of CBD products — tinctures, skin patches, drink powders, candies, salves, massage oil, lotions, “sexy time personal intimacy oil” and even vaginal suppositories to treat menstrual cramps.

The buzz around CBD continues to grow as hemp deregulation spreads across the country. Stories of CBD healing a bedridden child or an autistic individual has inspired hope in those parents looking for an alternative remedy. Yet, ironically, when you try to actually look up the benefits of this chemical, it’s quite impossible to find. It seems like a lot of people are writing about how promising it is. But everyone is tiptoeing around the actual question. What does it actually do for you?
I just wanted to ask you what supplements in the 26 ways to recover article would be safe to take so it would not show a positive test even tho they aren’t nsf. I had knee microfracture knee surgery in the past and I want to keep that healthy as well as a groin injury I’m tending too. Plus always trying to get stronger. If you’d be able to just throw a quick list it would be greatly appreciated. I’ve already purchased the marine phyto but I want to make sure it’s safe before I take it
Hi Ben, your product sounds amazing! I am 60 years old, have had Neurosarcoidosis for the past 35 years, am a 5 yr colon cancer survivor, and have been recently diagnosed with Pseudotumor Cerebrii (IIH). Between the Neurosarc and the PTC my optic nerves have been greatly affected. My question is about possible drug interactions with your product. Are there any? Specifically, any adverse interactions when the your product is taken in conjunction with Effexor XR, or Toprol XL. Or if one is allergic to Sulfa drugs. Hoping I can take your product and that it will have a positive effect in reducing my “Brain Pain”, optic nerve swelling, and various other neuro symptoms and pain. Thanks.
Hemp oil does have a number of uses and is often marketed as a cooking oil or a product that is good for moisturizing the skin. It is also used in the production of certain soaps, shampoos, and foods. It is also a basic ingredient for bio-fuel and even a more sustainable form of plastic. Hemp has been cultivated and used for roughly 10,000 years, and it definitely has useful purposes. However, a lack of cannabinoids, namely CBD, means that it has little therapeutic value.
At the federal level, CBD is classified as a Schedule 1 drug in the U.S. because it is one of the many cannabinoids present in marijuana. To be labeled a schedule 1 drug means that it has a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological or physical dependence; therefore these drugs are not allowed to be used for medical use.
In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Epidiolex (a drug made with a purified form of CBD oil) in June 2018 for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy in patients 2 years of age and older. These two epilepsy forms are known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. Epidiolex is the first FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from marijuana.
Scott Shannon, M.D., assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”

A 2014 survey conducted by researchers at Stanford University was presented to parents belonging to a Facebook group dedicated to sharing information about the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis to treat their child’s seizures. Nineteen responses met the inclusion criteria for the study: a diagnosis of epilepsy and current use of CBD-enriched cannabis. The average number of anti-epileptic drugs tried before using CBD cannabis was 12. Sixteen (84 percent) of the 19 parents reported a reduction in their child’s seizure frequency while taking CBD cannabis. Of these, two (11 percent) reported complete seizure freedom, eight (42 percent) reported a greater than 80 percent reduction in seizure frequency, and six (32 percent) reported a 25–60 percent seizure reduction. Other beneficial effects included increased alertness, better mood and improved sleep; while side effects included drowsiness and fatigue. (14)
Several studies point to the potential benefits of CBD for anxiety. For generalized anxiety, the National Institute on Drug Abuse says that CBD has been shown to reduce stress in animal studies. Study subjects were observed as having lower behavioral signs of anxiety. Their physiological symptoms of anxiety, like increased heart rate, also improved.

For people who suffer from insomnia, constant anxiety during the night or simply struggle to get a sound, restful night of undisturbed sleep, cannabis sativa essential oil may work like a charm. However, according to a research report published by Dr. Ethan Russo, Director of Research for the International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute, terpenoids produce an “entourage effect”.
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