Disclaimer: We always recommend that you speak with a licensed medical practitioner before modifying, stopping, or starting use of any medications. The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.
For individuals suffering from pain and physical ailments, CBD can be one of the best choices for helping you fall asleep. Through several recent studies, CBD has been shown to help alleviate symptoms of PTSD, MS, inflammation, muscular and joint dysfunction, and of course, insomnia. This is because CBD can help to relieve pain, which can prove to be a serious inhibitor of sleep. CBD can be taken as a pill or through inhaling, which is sometimes a more effective way of inducing a restful state. However, pills can act more quickly on the brain than inhalation methods, which is a consideration for those seeking a faster cure for insomnia from CBD.
Juliana Birnbaum is trained as a cultural anthropologist and skilled in four languages and has lived and worked in the U.S., Europe, Japan, Nepal, Costa Rica and Brazil. In 2005 she founded Voices in Solidarity, an initiative that partnered with Ashaninka indigenous tribal leaders from the Brazilian Amazon to support the development of the Yorenka Ãtame community-led environmental educational center featured in Sustainable [R]evolution. She was the first graduate of the Cornerstone Doula School, one of the most rigorous natural birth programs in the U.S., focusing on a holistic model of care. She is engaged variously as writer, editor, teacher, midwife assistant and mother when not attempting new yoga poses or learning how to garden.

I have read that taking CBD oil may help in the reduction of the size of tumors (specifically brain tumors). I’ve been taking Hemp oil instead, as that’s what came up when I did a search for CBD oil on a popular website. (My first bottle was not flavored and tasted absolutely horrible. Next one was mint-flavored and tastes far better.) Wanted to know if Hemp oild would give me similar results as CBD.
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Tuesday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $2.75, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Tuesday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
Cannabidiol oil has been accepted as a means of relaxation, and its popularity is steadily on the increase. The use of CBD hemp oil being very new, there is still much to be learned about its effects. CBD oil’s precise benefits are still a subject that is debatable, but we can confidently state that Cannabidiol is completely safe, and legal to use.
I just read your comment on Mary Vance’s website and had to reread the study. It turns out that you are correct. The wording is misleading and I am so disappointed because I wanted to believe. I just purchased some CBD oil for my high cortisol levels. I can’t believe that people are quoting this study when it states the exact opposite. Thank you for pointing that out.
This isn’t new but had to be mentioned. One of the major and well-known benefits of cannabis is its ability to treat pain and helping with pain management. It has the capabilities of assisting with chronic pain as well as inflammation. Furthermore, it has been found to help patients deal with severe rheumatism and arthritis as well as other chronic pains.
Rich in CBD, cannabis has been used for centuries to fight illness, improve sleep, and lower anxiety. Today, our understanding of the potential benefits of CBD is growing by leaps and bounds—more and more, CBD is seen as a powerful disease-fighting agent. Thanks to decades of scientific investigation, it’s now possible to get the benefits of CBD in supplement form.
Recently, lemon balm produced an unexpected result: it greatly increased the ability to concentrate and perform word and picture tasks. In a study at Northumbria University in England, students were tested for weeks while using either lemon balm or a placebo. The students did significantly better on the tests after taking lemon balm and continued to post improved scores for up to six hours after taking the herb. The students taking lemon balm were noted to be calmer and less stressed during the tests.
This taboo, which started around the same time that the US government outlawed cannabis, continues to slow down the progress for medical research around CBD. The FDA and DEA refuse to change their stance on cannabis, which is quite odd considering the US government holds onto a patent that highlights the benefits of CBD. Ultimately, all of this taboo and restrictions have inhibited extensive research around CBD and all the other cannabinoids in cannabis. (Cannabis is known to have 85+ different cannabinoids, many of them potentially having health benefits)
A 2013 study that measured data from 4,652 participants on the effect of cannabis on metabolic systems compared non-users to current and former users. It found that current users had higher blood levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) or “good cholesterol.” The same year, an analysis of over seven hundred members of Canada’s Inuit community found that, on average, regular cannabis users had increased levels of HDL-C and slightly lower levels of LDL-C (“bad cholesterol”).

Leonard Leinow has three decades of experience growing and studying medical cannabis and brings a unique spiritual perspective to his work. In 2009, he formed Synergy Wellness, a not-for-profit medical cannabis collective in California. Synergy Wellness has over 3,500 members in its collective and is an artisan organization making hand-crafted organic and natural whole plant-based products. They are specialists in CBD (cannabidiol), the non-psychoactive portion of cannabis, and are pioneers in this aspect of the industry. Leinow is known for his proprietary blends of tinctures and medicine used for cancer and epilepsy patients.
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