Relevant studies in animal models are summarized in chronological order in Table ​Table1.1. CBD has been studied in a wide range of animal models of general anxiety, including the elevated plus maze (EPM), the Vogel-conflict test (VCT), and the elevated T maze (ETM). See Table ​Table11 for the anxiolytic effect specific to each paradigm. Initial studies of CBD in these models showed conflicting results: high (100 mg/kg) doses were ineffective, while low (10 mg/kg) doses were anxiolytic [59, 60]. When tested over a wide range of doses in further studies, the anxiolytic effects of CBD presented a bell-shaped dose–response curve, with anxiolytic effects observed at moderate but not higher doses [61, 90]. All further studies of acute systemic CBD without prior stress showed anxiolytic effects or no effect [62, 65], the latter study involving intracerebroventricular rather than the intraperitoneal route. No anxiogenic effects of acute systemic CBD dosing in models of general anxiety have yet been reported. As yet, few studies have examined chronic dosing effects of CBD in models of generalized anxiety. Campos et al. [66] showed that in rat, CBD treatment for 21 days attenuated inhibitory avoidance acquisition [83]. Long et al. [69] showed that, in mouse, CBD produced moderate anxiolytic effects in some paradigms, with no effects in others.
Cannabis also has links to Christianity – specifically through the Ethiopian Coptic Church, which is held to have been established by St. Mark (the guy in the New Testament of The Bible) in AD 45. The Copts claim that the use of marijuana as a sacrament descended from a Jewish sect called the Essenes (the folks who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls). According to the Coptic Church, cannabis played an important role in early Christian and Judaic rituals, specifically as a sacrament burned in tabernacles, to commemorate important occasions such as communication with God on Mount Sinai by Moses, and the transfiguration of Christ.
The cannabis plant is filled with hundreds of different compounds, several of which have been studied for decades for their therapeutic benefits. The cannabis compounds that have captured the most scientific interest are known as cannabinoids. Cannabinoids are now used in treatment for a broad—and growing—range of conditions and symptoms, from sleep and pain, to anxiety and inflammation, to Parkinson’s disease and cancer.
Summary: Early research has found that CBD oil has the potential to reduce chronic pain, anxiety, depression and acne, and may help those overcoming addiction. Its anti-inflammatory properties may also play a role in lowering the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It has even shown anti-tumor effects and could be effective in inhibiting the progression of cancer and its related symptoms.
If you have ever suffered from anxiety, then you know that it is awful, and it would be the same for your dog too. Many dogs suffer from anxiety and have been known to be depressed and extremely anxious in certain situations, such as when their owner leaves. This can result in destructive behaviors such as chewing objects, urinating, pacing, and more. CBD helps because it is a relaxing stimulant that calms your pet.

Answering the question “what is CBD oil” would be incomplete without mentioning the many CBD oil benefits. In addition to positively affecting the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been the focus of more than 23,000 published studies about cannabinoids in relation to various medical indications including anxiety, epilepsy, inflammation, cancer and chronic pain to name few. For a more comprehensive look at these and other studies, visit our medical research and education page.
I have tried NatureCBD and believe in the product. I particularly noticed alleviation in joint pain and reduction in stress – although stress reduction may have been supported by pain reduction. However, since I live in Canada and it is expensive to ship, I have been using CBD from a licensed medical marijuana facility. The effect is not as powerful as from NatureCBD. I had not really considered the bioavailability issue; perhaps that is the reason for the weaker effect. Or possibly it could be the other herbs added, or the synergistic effect. In any case, I am going to bite the bullet (at least my visa card will) and go back to NatureCBD.
The nervous system’s endocannabinoid system is not well understood. But it’s thought to play a role in regulating pain, sleep, mood, memory, appetite, and other cognitive and physical processes. Because CBD is able to mimic the actions of some natural brain chemicals, its potential therapeutic benefits are wide-ranging but—at this point—nebulous. “We know that cannabidiol modulates the endocannabinoid system, but we don’t know how it works,” Szaflarski says. That said, there are theories.
To meet legal standards in the United States, CBD oil and other products may contain up to 0.3% THC; low enough to avoid all psychoactive effects, but enough to potentially appear on a sensitive drug test. Kat’s Naturals, however, sells CBE products of the utmost purity, containing 0% THC, and free from pesticides, chemicals, and contaminants. The company works with organic hemp cultivated in the Netherlands, and extracts its CBD using a broad-spectrum critical CO2 process, retaining a high amount of omega 3’s and 6’s (heart-healthy fats), vitamins, and phytochemicals. Kat’s Naturals is also big on using synergistic essential oils- also organic- to enhance their CBD’s therapeutic effects. The best CBD for anxiety in their lineup is Relax, a tincture that combines 300 mg CBD, Organic Hempseed oil, and wild orange essential oil, along with Hops oil, a potent calming botanical which has been used to promote sleep since ancient times. Kat’s Naturals recommends this product explicitly as a great CBD for anxiety, as well as for promoting sound sleep, making this an excellent choice for anxiety-induced insomnia.
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